A Map of Absence

A Map of Absence presents the finest poetry and prose by Palestinian writers over the last seventy years. Featuring writers in the diaspora and those living under occupation, these striking entries pay testament to one of the most pivotal events in modern history – the 1948 Nakba.

This unique, landmark anthology includes translated excerpts of works by major authors such as Mahmoud Darwish, Ghassan Kanafani and Fadwa Tuqan alongside those of emerging writers, published here in English for the first time. Depicting the varied aspects of Palestinian life both before and after 1948, their writings highlight the ongoing resonances of the Nakba.

An intimate companion for all lovers of world literature, A Map of Absence reveals the depth and breadth of Palestinian writing.

Love in the Kingdom of Oil

A woman disappears without trace. Nobody, including the police commissioner investigating the case, can understand how a woman could simply walk away, leaving husband and home behind. After all, in the Kingdom of Oil where His Majesty reigns supreme, no woman has ever dared disobey the command of men.

When the woman finally reappears, there is a blurring between the men in her life, as she leaves one to join another, then returns to her first husband who has since taken a new wife. She is trapped in a man-made web, unable to escape from a male figure who continually fills urns that she must carry.

Zeina

Distinguished literary critic Bodour is trapped in a loveless marriage and carries with her a dark secret. She fell in love in her youth and gave birth to an illegitimate daughter, Zeina, whom she abandoned on the streets of Cairo.

Bodour doesn’t know that Zeina has blossomed into one of Egypt’s most beloved entertainers. Pining for her estranged daughter, she writes a fictional account of her life in an attempt to find solace. But as the revolution in Cairo begins to gain fire, the novel goes missing and Bodour must find who has stolen it. Will her hunt for the thief bring mother and daughter together? Or is Bodour destined to lose her daughter to Cairo forever?

Rembrandt, Vermeer and the Dutch Golden Age

Rembrandt, Vermeer and the Dutch Golden Age presents the finest pieces from one of the most important private collections in the field, The Leiden Collection, New York, alongside a selection from the Louvre’s own holdings.

This exhibition catalogue highlights Dutch culture through the artwork of its halcyon days. Seventeenth-century Holland experienced unprecedented prosperity, leading the way for European trade and science. And in art, Dutch artists pioneered still life, landscape and genre painting. The detailed realism of the paintings of the Dutch Golden Age sets it apart from the outlandish splendour typical of the Baroque movement. Portraiture also underwent a revival in form and popularity during this period.

Alongside Rembrandt, artists such as Jan Lievens, Gerrit Dou, Frans van Mieris, Frans Hals and and that virtuoso master of genre painting Johannes Vermeer were prolific during this time. They infused new life into Dutch art and together their vision created a national artistic awakening. Here, their collective work provides a dazzling glimpse into the Dutch Golden Age.

Memoirs of a Woman Doctor

A young Egyptian woman clashes with her traditional family when she chooses a career in medicine. Rather than submit to an arranged marriage and motherhood, she cuts her hair short and works fiercely to realise her dreams. At medical school, she begins to understand the mysteries of the human body. After years of denying her own desires, the doctor begins a series of love affairs that allow her to explore her sexuality – on her own terms.

 

Believing Women in Islam

Does Islam call for the oppression of women? The subjugation of women in many Muslim countries is often used as evidence of this, while many Muslims read the Qur’an in ways that seem to justify sexual oppression and inequality. In this paradigm-shifting book, Asma Barlas argues that, far from supporting male privilege, the Qur’an actually affirms the complete equality of the sexes.

Offering a historical analysis of religious authority and knowledge, Barlas shows how, for centuries, Muslims have read patriarchy into the Qur’an to justify existing religious and social structures. In this seminal volume, she takes readers into the heart of Islamic teachings on women, gender and patriarchy, offering an egalitarian reading of Islam’s most sacred scripture.

This revised edition includes two new chapters, a new preface, and updates throughout.